It's a Bull Rider's Dream Come True at the DCU Center

"For these bull riders, it’s in their blood. Their dads did it, their families and friends do it. It’s a right of passage for some—and a grueling one at that."

It's a Bull Rider's Dream Come True at the DCU Center

It all started in 1992, with 20 bull riders from the rodeo circuit looking for the freedom to create a bold new take on the sport they loved, and a pool of money to kickstart a collective dream—a dream now known as the PBR. Now, nearly three decades later, they could never have imagined what their new, standalone sport, would look like today—and that’s the fastest growing sport in America.

 

 

In the arena, PBR is known for its intense bull riding, skilled riders, pyro, music, and sellout crowds. If you look where no one’s watching, you’ll find a group of down to earth rodeo dreamers—a brotherhood, despite the lucrative championships hanging over their heads.

The reality is: PBR has roots that run deep in American culture worth more than any payout. Most bull riders start off as mesmerized kids in the stands watching and waiting for their time to travel the country and ride the massive, iconic animals, so strong, that the riders on their backs are nothing but a mere fly in the face.

For these bull riders, it’s in their blood. Their dads did it, their families and friends do it. It’s a right of passage for some—and a grueling one at that. To outlast the toughest of animal athletes in an 8-second duel is a feat in itself. On Saturday night, all riders must at least attempt one bull each in Round 1, with the best of the night making it into the Top 10. If they can make it through the final bull, 170 world points, a cash prize, and an invite to compete on the elite PBR Unleash The Beast will be theirs and their dreams will be made.